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What if there’s a fall and nobody’s there to help?

fall-alert-system-jupiter-flEven when a caregiver makes diligent efforts to prevent their elderly parent from falling, falls are often inevitable. Falls can result from a variety of conditions such as mobility, difficulty from arthritis, vertigo from poor circulation, negative reactions to medication, etc. Whatever the cause, more than one third of seniors will fall this year.

Personal emergency response systems can help by providing a “panic button” device that a senior can press if an accident occurs. But what happens if the senior is unconscious, forgets to wear the device, or is in shock from falling and simply forgets to press the button? In those cases, that “panic button” is essentially useless.

Fall detection sensors measure a person’s sway, orientation, and impact with surface.The senior clips on a chest strap or wrist band.

Because the strap comes in contact with the skin, the monitoring company and caregiver will know if the senior is wearing the device, or they forget to put it on.

A similar product is a pendant-style help button that can automatically place a call for help if it detects a fall.

These devices use sensors to constantly monitor a person’s movement and activities. It uses multiple sensors to constantly monitor a person’s movement by assessing height, orientation and accelerated movement to distinguish between normal activities and falls. For example, when a person is walking, sitting in chair or getting out of bed, the systems are monitoring those motions as normal activity. The LifeCall Automatic Fall Alert System measures the acceleration in changes in movement, as well as the person’s height and heart rate. When a person falls, the device automatically senses the acceleration of a movement and change in height. The monitoring system automatically activates and calls for emergency help, as well as contacting the caregiver.

This type of technology enables caregivers to take comfort in knowing their parent’s button will call for help, even if they can’t.

5 Remote Monitoring Services for Caregivers

Senior care at home can be challenging, especially when adult children do not live nearby. Knowing how to care for an aging parent from a remote location reduces the stress for both you and your loved one. These five types of remote monitoring services can ensure the safety and well-being of an aging parent when you cannot be there yourself.

Medical Alert System Remote Monitoring Services

A medical alert system makes getting help as easy as pressing a button. There are two types of medical alert systems used in home care for seniors: monitored and unmonitored. Both consist of a device worn around the neck or wrist, or pinned to clothing. The individual presses a button that places a call to a predetermined telephone number. In monitored systems, the call goes to a live operator who can then talk with the subscriber. In an unmonitored system, the call plays a pre-recorded message to the recipient.

Choose  LifeCall for Around The Clock Peace of Mind
The simplicity and completeness of LifeCall‘s emergency monitoring program means you will receive experienced, professional help from certified Emergency Medical Technicians when you need it. The heart of this Bosch system is the LifeCall console itself, which is designed for tabletop use and is ideal for bedside placement.

LifeCall has more than 35 years of experience in life safety and security systems. It is one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

CarrierAlert

The U.S. Postal Service keeps a watchful eye on customers registered in the Carrier Alert program. Since its introduction in 1982, Carrier Alert has helped thousands of citizens get help and, in some cases, can even saves lives.

In this program, letter carriers notify supervisors when mail accumulates in the mailbox of a Carrier Alert participant. Supervisors then attempt to contact the individual by telephone, through the registering agency, or through police intervention.

FREE Daily Check-in Phone Calls

There is no substitute for the sound of the human voice, especially for someone struggling with the social isolation associated with being homebound. CareSolver recommends Always in Touch, a free program that telephones clients on a regular basis.

Medical ID Bracelet

A medical ID bracelet speaks volumes for those who unable to communicate for themselves. If someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia wanders from home, caregivers can call a 24-hour response line to activate a community support network to locate the individual. Anyone discovering the individual may call the number on the bracelet to reunite him with his family. Medical ID jewelry is personalized with his pertinent information, such as allergies and medical conditions.

Check-In Point Person

Enlist the help of others in your elderly parent care. Ask someone to be the official check-in point person, or the “go-to guy” when things go wrong. The check-in point person should live in your loved one’s neighborhood so he can provide immediate assistance in case of emergency.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes. www.lifecall.com

Is A Personal Medical Alarm Right For You?

If you fell and couldn’t get up, could you get help? Maybe a Personal Medical Alarm is right for you.

Though experts agree that a wearable alarm system may not help in all situations or be appropriate for all elderly people, it could be lifesaving for some.

It’s estimated that one-third of elderly people living at home and two-thirds of those living in assisted living facilities fall each year. These mishaps result directly in about 1,800 deaths and contribute to at least 9,500 fatalities.

For many people, a personal medical alarm can be lifesavers. Whether the alarm is right for the individual depends partially on their mental and physical conditions and those of their caregivers.

So is a transportable alarm right for you or an elderly relative? To make that decision, you will have to consider the lifestyle of the person, their physical and mental abilities, the cost of the service, and what it provides.

The LifeCall Medical Alert System is priced as low as $27.45 a month, with no long term contracts. This complete and easy-to-operate emergency monitoring program means you will receive experienced, professional help from certified Emergency Medical Technicians when you need it.

Exercise is the key
Exercise is one of the most important ways to prevent falls. Exercise builds muscle strength and stamina, which help improve coordination and balance. Even people who have a lot of frailty can benefit from exercise in general. It can be argued that inactivity is the third leading cause of death in the elderly.

Other advice from experts includes:

  • You should talk with your doctor about whether certain medications or medical conditions, including your vision and hearing, may be causing you to stumble or fall.
  • Check for stairs and railings that may be in disrepair and carpets that may have loose seams.
  • Get rid of throw rugs.
  • Add grab bars to your bathroom.
  • Don’t sit on furniture that is so low that it’s difficult to sit down or get up.
  • Wear shoes that are comfortable and fit properly.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.